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Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya
About Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya

Once considered the most spectacular city on Earth, the ruins of the capital of the Kingdom Ayutthaya are now a major tourist attraction easily accessible from Bangkok by car, train, or boat as either a daytrip or overnight excursion.

How to go
Ordinary busses depart from Bangkok’s Northern Bus Terminal (Mo Chit 2) for Ayutthaya's main terminal on Naresuan Road every 20 minutes between 5 a.m. and 7 p.m. The fare is 30 baht and the trip takes around 2 hours. Air-conditioned busses operate the same route every 20 minutes from 5.40 a.m. to 7.20 p.m. (departing every 15 minutes between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.) at around 50 baht; the trip takes 1.5 hours when traffic north of Bangkok is light, otherwise it takes two hours.
Trains to Ayutthaya leave Bangkok's Hua Lumphong Station approximately every hour between 4.20 a.m. and 10.00 p.m. Train schedules are available from the information booth at Hua Lumphong Station. Alternatively, call 0 2223 7010, 0 2223 7020, or 1690 or visit www.railway.co.th for reservations.
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Recommended

Wat Phra Si Sanphet

In 1491, Wat Phra Si Sanphet was located inside the compound of the Grand Palace-the foundations of which are still visible-and served as the royal chapel, as Wat Phra Kaeo does in Bangkok. This Wang Lung Palace (Royal Palace) was built by King U-Thong upon the founding of the city. Used as a residential palace, it became a monastery in the reign of King Ramathibodi I. When King Borom Trai Lokanat commanded the construction of new living quarters, this residential palace was transformed into a temple,and the establishment of Wat Phra Si Sanphet. In Ayutthaya's heyday, this was the largest temple in the city. The three main chedis which have been restored contain the ashes of three Ayutthaya kings. The temple is situated at the northern end of Si Sanphet Road. The royal chapel does not have any monks and novice inhabitants. Admission fee is 20 bahts.

Wat Phra Si Sanphet

Wihan Phra Mongkhon Bophit

This chapel is located to the south of Wat Phra Si Sanphet. A large bronze seated Buddha image (Phra Mongkhon Bophit) was originally enshrined outside the Grand Palace to the east. It could be dated to the 15th century and was originally intended to stand in the open air. Later, King Songtham commanded it to be transferred to the west, where it is currently enshrined and covered with a Mondop.

Wihan Phra Mongkhon Bophit

Wat Phra Mahathat

Wat Mahathat is located in front of the Grand Palace to the east, next to Pa Than Bridge. The temple is believed to be one of Ayutthaya's oldest temples, possibly built by King Boromaraja I (1370-88).

Wat Phra Mahathat
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